Adult Studio Art

Students learn the process of creating, designing and building their own personal mask. Participants will be expected to use their wildest ideas about creatures and myths when designing their work. Work will be executed sculpting clay, papier-mâché, and wire. We will also be adding our own hand- sewn costumes to create creatures both magical and scary. And as a group, we will also build a large parading puppet. These will be part of the Fall Family Festival Parade, which will depart from the Farnsworth’s sculpture garden at 5:30 p.m. on October 18th in Rockland. Participating students should be old enough to work independently, or have adult supervision.

In this 3-week introductory class, students will explore watercolor's transparent qualities. Together we will learn about washes, gradations, tonal values, manipulating and controlling the medium while being open to its endless surprises.

Artist Lesia Sochor is a graduate of the Philadelphia College of Art and is an enthusiastic teacher who believes anyone has the ability to create. She has lived, painted and exhibited in Maine for 34 years.

Cost: $123, $105 members

This 7-week class will introduce a variety of techniques and will focus on integrating new processes on the painting surface. Each class will begin with a demonstration, and allow plenty of time for experimentation and individual attention. We will work on a number of smaller “practice pieces” as well as develop a larger piece to work on throughout the course. Basic composition, theme and concepts of design will be covered during class time. We will be using water-based paints and mediums, drawing, collage, printing, and various tools for paint application. Whether participants choose to work figuratively or abstractly, they will be encouraged to find expression and meaning in their own work.

In this 10-week class, students will work on existing drawing and painting projects or on a directed course of the basics, depending on each individual’s level of skill and personal needs. The class will primarily take place in the lower classroom of the Gamble Center and outdoors, weather permitting. Each session will have brief discussion at the beginning and a sharing critique of work completed at the end. Working between sessions is encouraged. The class is open to all ages (6 to 106).

Note: The class may meet in an alternate space on 10/18 & 12/13.

For over 25 years, artist Sam Cady taught in the MFA program at the School of Visual Arts in New York. He shows at the Caldbeck Gallery in Rockland. His own drawings and paintings begin with the physical, visible world and the ideas and emotions it triggers.

In this half-day introductory class, participants will learn the basics of relief printing, one of the earliest forms of printmaking.  The class will begin at the Project Puffin Visitor Center (located at 311 Main Street in downtown Rockland), where participants will observe and sketch seabirds via the Center's webcams. The group will discuss image ideas and design approaches by looking at examples of relief prints, including those on view in exhibition at the visitor center by artist and instructor, Sherrie York.
 
Have you ever wanted to learn how to make your own hooked rug? Students are invited to join a three-day class devoted to learning the craft of traditional rug hooking. In this introductory class, the rich history of primitive rug design will be discussed and step-by-step rug hooking basics will be taught, which will include preparing foundation material, cutting the wool, and hooking with yarn and silk. Students will also learn about tools such as hooks, frames and hoops, and they will be shown various hooking techniques and finishing options. By the end of the class, each student will have made a 12” x 12” rug from start to finish. No prior rug hooking experience is required.  All materials will be provided by the instructor.
 
Led by poet Kathleen Ellis, this workshop will explore the connections between poetry and art, using the museum’s current exhibits, Rockland’s waterfront, and the Olson House as sources for writing. Experimentation with a wide range of poetic forms will be used to jumpstart new poems. The workshop will also include collaborative activities as well as daily group critiques.
 
This workshop will explore the ways in which single words or phrases can generate poems. Choosing words or terms from a trade or art, natural flora and fauna, or community vernacular, we’ll consider how they shape values, world view, or ideas about identity or one’s environment. How do we redefine them according to our experience and imagination? Using the museum’s current exhibits, local gardens, and area woodlands as sources for writing, students will experiment with a wide range of poetic forms to jumpstart new poems.
 
Location: upstairs of the Gamble Education Center
Level: beginner to advanced writers
Materials: bring personal writing materials to class
Learn the art of Mokuhanga, a traditional Japanese woodblock printing process, in this intensive introductory workshop. Each participant will cut and print an edition of color prints to learn about this water-based, nontoxic technique. Mokuhanga provides precise registration and great control over color and a connection to an important chapter in the history of printmaking. Students will cut blocks during the first half of class and print during the second half. Each class will begin with a discussion of a different aspect of Japanese woodblock.